Tuesday, November 10, 2009

Employee Etiquette: Being Held Accountable

 If your business has more than one employee, you inevitably have to deal with the question of accountability. Something is left incomplete or a task is not performed and someone must be held accountable. As an organization increases in size, so does the chain of accountability.

     The truth is that the individual may be at fault but, quite often, they are responding to a larger environment. The work atmosphere dictates how an individual performs. In the big picture, employees will generally respond in a similar fashion to their superiors.

     A good manager knows the right way to foster a spirit of accountability. For example, adherence to guidelines is crucial. If you set deadlines, stick to them. If you don't, why should your employee? Do you adhere to schedules of meetings by starting and finishing on time? What about follow up? There is nothing worse than assigning a task and ignoring the follow up. The old fashioned "red flag" system still works wonders. Mark assignment dates in your date book (remember those?) and attach a little coloured sticker to show you when you have to check it. Finish your meetings with a summary so that everyone knows what was discussed and what lies ahead.

     We have all learned to give positive encouragement. However, a manager who is afraid of giving negative feedback is far less effective. Certainly, there are constructive ways to deliver criticism. There is also a realistic limit how many times an employee can make the same mistake before having to re-evaluate their position. Management is a skill that must be used correctly to derive maximum achievement. Like any aspect of business, it has an accounting system that must be properly balanced. Learning how to create that fine balance is one of the secrets of a successful business organization.

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