Wednesday, September 9, 2009

To Buy the Competitor or Not to Buy

Although the state of the economy is still uncertain, this should not affect whether a company should pursue acquisition of a competitor, if that is its intent. Rather, one should be somewhat more prudent and disciplined in how one evaluates the potential purchase.

During these recent difficult times, the markets have naturally focused their attention on companies in distress. This should not translate into a belief that the entire business sector is in ruins. However, as the competition may be in dire straits due to the present financial crisis should not be a reason to abandon ideas of purchasing that company. Careful assessment of the competitor is crucial. Seek to understand why that company is losing money. Will your investment merely save a struggling enterprise that was on its way to closure anyway or are there other factors at play that will make this a worthwhile purchase?

It is important to dissect the company and understand how it works. Were there management problems? Did the company mismanage its relationships with its customers and suppliers? Were the employees mistreated and, therefore, did they not perform well? Is the machinery sub-standard, thus affecting the product? Examining the company with a fine-toothed comb will allow you to make an effective decision as to whether this company can merge with yours. Similarly, it is important to do a proper evaluation of your own company. Are you in a position to absorb this company? Do you have the management capabilities for this merge? Will your staff cope with the additional production and sales? Will you need capital to overhaul machinery? Similarly, examine your goals. Perhaps you are only interested in expanding your customer base. In that case, go directly to the competitor's customers, rather than affecting a buyout.

Research is your best business ally.

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